Save Money On Groceries By Re-Growing Food From Kitchen Scraps

A Fun Guest Post by Alex Goodwin

I have not tried all of Alex’s suggestions here, so I can’t vouch for them, but I certainly will try them. Ginger is the one I’ve done – what a beautiful edible plant. Also, when I was a kid we used to sprout avocado trees from the pits by hanging half of the pit in a cup of water by suspending it from a trio of toothpicks jammed into the sides of the pit. But avocado trees get enormous and you better live where it doesn’t freeze if you want to grow one. Here’s Alex Goodwin for y’all folks.

Save Money On Groceries By Re-Growing Food From Kitchen Scraps

If you’re anything like me and my wife when it comes to looking for ways to save money and lower our bills, you’ll be happy to discover that one of the easiest and really fun methods of doing this has been lurking in your very own kitchen!

After we purchase, prepare, and consume the food we buy, there are almost always little bits of food left that just get thrown away. Why do we do that? Some of these scraps of food can actually serve another function. They can be replanted and grown again.

While it isn’t possible to do it with everything we consume, most vegetables and some fruits do have the capacity to regrow themselves from replanted scraps. Let’s take a look at some of the common foods you might have in your home that you can start with now.

Onions

Onions are the easiest of vegetables to regrow because they have the highest success rate and only require a little bit of work to replant. First, cut off any part of the onion that remains about the roots except for maybe a half inch. Then, plant the roots in a sunny area in a raised bed garden so that they will have plenty of sunlight.

Pineapples

Pineapples are a fun food to grow because they are so delicious! You need to start by taking the green, leafy area that is located at the top of the pineapple. Make sure that all pieces of actual fruit have been removed. It’s necessary that all of the fruit is removed to keep it from rotting and killing your plant. This only leaves the part of the pineapple that nobody eats anyways.

When you first plant them in your garden, you should water them regularly. After a few weeks you can cut back to watering your pineapples just once a week. A few months later you will begin to see growth. It may take up to a couple years before you can actually eat the pineapples, but you will have a permanent plant that will continually bear fruit every season.

Garlic

Garlic is also another type of plant that can be easily regrown from scraps. This can be done by planting a single clove root-down into the soil. At first, it will grow new shoots, which you will want to cut off. After they have been cut, the garlic will put all its energy into producing a new bulb, recreating the original garlic plant that was consumed.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are capable of re-growing their eye-shoots, which allow for more potatoes to grow off of them. This can be done by planting either a whole, or even just a little piece, of a  sweet potato in a jar of water. After a week, new shoots should have sprouted out by now. Remove the side sprouts and leave the shoots forming near the top of the potato.

Ginger

Ginger isn’t as commonly used, but it can also be regrow from just a food scrap. Take a piece of ginger rhizome — the part of the plant you cook with — and have the newly sprouted bud areas facing towards the surface. Ginger likes stay out of direct contact with sunlight but still be able to reach it. You should also keep the area around your ginger moist. The plant will sprout a whole new set of roots and shoots, which then will begin growing duplicates of the plant. When harvesting, pull the whole plant out of the ground and cut off more pieces of rhizome. Use what you need and then place the rest back into the ground so that you can repeat the process.

Other tips and considerations

Many of the food you can re-grow from kitchens scraps do not require a lot of space and can be grown indoors with mason jars if you don’t have the space for a traditional garden. Large planting pots are good for high-rise balconies because they are less likely to blow over and they require less water. To add style and an extra touch of sustainability, you can try using bio-degradable planting pots that are been constructed from renewable plant by-products.

About the author:

Alex is a blogger, husband, father and aspiring slipstream fantasy novelist. When he isn’t writing for HomeDaddys or completing chores from his “honey- do” list, he’s most likely spending quality time with his wife and kids or working on his novel.

 

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